You know, they straightened out the Mississippi River in places, to make room for houses and livable acreage. Occasionally the river floods these places. “Floods” is the word they use, but in fact it is not flooding; it is remembering. Remembering where it used to be. All water has a perfect memory and is forever trying to get back to where it was. Writers are like that: remembering where we were, what valley we ran through, what the banks were like, the light that was there and the route back to our original place. It is emotional memory — what the nerves and the skin remember as well as how it appeared. And a rush of imagination if is our “flooding.”

Toni Morrison, excerpt from “The Site of Memory,” What Moves at the Margin: Selected Nonfiction  (via commovente)

(via bethrevis)

kadrey:

Ink wash Xenomorphs

(via cleolinda)

Been there.

(Source: officialaudreykitching, via queenalib)

title2come:

Writing Fiction

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Writing Fantasy

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Writing Sci-Fi

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Writing Literary Fiction

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diannesylvan:

The Alnwick Poison Garden is pretty much what you’d think it is: a garden full of plants that can kill you (among many other things). Some of the plants are so dangerous that they have to be kept behind bars. [x]

COOL.

(Source: bregma, via cleolinda)

We are, as a species, addicted to story. Even when the body goes to sleep, the mind stays up all night, telling itself stories.

Jonathan Gottschall, The Storytelling Animal: How Stories Make Us Human (via adderalldust)

(Source: revnaomiking, via gottaquoteit)

yourpaldignan:

urhajos:

Remakes

This is the kind of family I would like to have

(via queeferoni)

who-lligan:

Sometimes it’s like I’ve lived a thousand lives in a thousand places. I’m born. I live. I die. And always, there’s the Doctor.

fuckyeawecanlivelikethis:

I’ve always felt that most of my education came from the books I read rather than the teachers I had. 

(Source: serendipitousreadings, via queenalib)

cjredwine:

bethrevis:

Make it messy. 

Often, when we write, we think about what’s there. It’s new and shiny in your mind, so that often translates to new and shiny on the page. But you need to scratch it up, throw some dirt on it. Make it used. Give it scars. 

Do the same with your characters. It’s our scars that make us real, that prove we’ve been in this world.

This.